Look out, Orlando, here come the Choctaws! Thanks to winning their division of Small Varsity at the Universal Cheerleading Association (UCA) Southern Schools Championship at the Birmingham Jefferson Civic Center on Saturday, November 23, Bibb County High’s cheerleaders earned a spot in the UCA National competition that will be held at Disney World in February.

“I am so proud of this team and their determination to succeed. They are a talented group of girls who are not afraid of hard work. It is a blessing for me to be able to work with them and their parents,” said Coach Kecia Alston.

BCHS competes in the Game Day category of UCA events, which is essentially a practical skills contest for cheerleaders. It is based on the skills actually used on the sidelines during a game, with four subcategories: band dance, situational sideline chant, cheer, and fight song. Bibb competes in the Small Varsity classification, which means regardless of school size, the squad brings no more than 12 athletes. This is only the second year BCHS has competed in the Game Day competition.

The Choctaw ladies have recently competed in two other events. The North Alabama Regional Competition at Sparkman High School in Huntsville on November 2, and the Alabama High School Athletics Association (AHSAA) Regional Competition in Mobile November 6, where they finished 6th out of 14 5A teams and qualified to compete in State Competition on December 14.

The team, lead by Coaches Kecia Alston and Kelsey Dulaney, is: Malli Lackey, Cydnie Haney, Rebecca Fondren, Jada Henderson, Mattie Alston, Noelle Hiott, Katelyn Hughes, Elly Bishop, Hannah Sears, Savannah Sonnier, Sydney Hobson, and Sydney Tindell.

Video courtesy of Kecia Alston:

 

SOURCEThe Bibb Voice
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A father, creative professional, and an alumnus of Bibb County High School, Jeremy has found his way back to Centreville after many years away. He studied Finance and Economics at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and almost a decade ago left the "normal" business world for audio and video production. A freelance writer, photographer, sound engineer, and film and video producer/director/editor, his work has appeared online for Southern Living, People, Health, Food & Wine, Sports Illustrated, Cooking Light, Al.com, It's a Southern Thing, and This Is Alabama, as well as for independent musicians and filmmakers across Alabama.

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